Tag Archives: Recreation

finding a hobby or a job… for the dog

4 Feb

So my high energy dog needs a hobby or a job. Behavior training is just not enough. He has been there, done that and is ready to move on.
I investigated around town for specialty training and it is a tie between nose tracking and agility. I am not sure which one will be better, I hope one will work.
It is hard to know what to do exactly as he won’t tell me his preference. I am going to give him a shot at both. I think the other dogs will like it too, they will train along side of him at home.

Hopefully I will have an update.

What would happen to your pets if you died?

31 Jul

Have you wondered what would happen to your pet if you passed away?  A tragedy on your part, I understand, but what of them?  Presuming you have taken care of your children if you have them and they are under age (through a will and discussions with peoples involved)…what about the dogs?

I laugh when super wealthy folks will their pets 10 million dollars, but I can sort of see their point.  I don’t know anyone that would really want my dogs (or be able to handle them) other than a short visit.  They would probably not be able to stay together (which they are used to)  Unless financially tended to and some provision made for them, they would go to the pound.  Their world would change forever. their content life of eating a certain food at a specific time, sleeping on the same spot, playing the same games and the loving pettings in each one’s specific favorite way would end.  You know they would mourn the changes and life they had.  They wouldn’t understand or know why it changes, just that is has. 

All the scent’s they are used to, the routines they count on, the pack they lovingly share  – perhaps that is a gap in the marketplace someone can open a business for.  BillyBob’s afterlife canine care…. Will us XXX.00 dollars and instructions…we will see that your dog’s care will continue as you wish – and they stay together (if more than one).  Loving environment guaranteed.  Billy Bob can hire loving retired people, kind-hearted teenager’s, and generally great pet loving people to help fill the gap in the pets lives.  Medical care for special needs dogs, exercise, play, and clean living space.  There can be attorney inspectors for  a person’s will wishes.  Maybe not 10 million dollars, but perhaps 20,000 dollars would allow a successful business and a great option for pets. Far fetched I know, but I just love my pups and I would be happy if they are provided for.  I wouldn’t burden anyone else, and someone could make a living.

I don’t know, clearly I am being a bit silly.  I just wonder from their perspective how hard it would be.  Yes they would adjust, I know.  We work hard at taking care of them in our own way, and we believe it is the best for our pets.  I guess it finds a way to work out most of the time.  I think I will look into being sure mine will be ok if an unforseen tragedy occurs.  Who knows maybe I will find a Billy Bob’s out there.

Calculating dog to human age How old are they really?

12 Jun

 

It always seems to me  like a dog ages in behavior/personality (capacity?) in the following way:

0 – 6 months upto a human 1 year old

6 months – 2 years – human toddler (2 – 4 years old)

2 years – 5 years human teenager

5 years – 9 years human adult

9 years on – human senior

 What have you found?

 

This is an excerpt that I found from an excellent and fun article.  Gayle did a nice job on this. 

DOGS
By Gayle Hickman

Aging is much faster during a dog’s first two years but varies among breeds. Large breeds, while they mature quicker, tend to live shorter lives. By the time they reach 5 they are considered “senior” dogs. Medium-sized breeds take around seven years to reach the senior stage, while small and toy breeds do not become seniors until around 10.

Many veterinarians agree that a pretty good guess on the age of pets can be made using the following formula. Although still simple, it is much more accurate than the seven-year method.

Assume that a 1-year-old dog is equal to a 12-year-old human and a 2-year-old dog is equal to a 24-year old human. Then add four years for every year after that. (Example: A 4-year-old dog would be 32 in human years.)

Since this method takes into consideration the maturity rate at the beginning of a dog’s life and also the slowing of the aging process in his later years, Martha Smith, director of veterinary services at Boston’s Animal Rescue League, feels that this is the more accurate calculation formula. Here is a chart, for easy reference:


 

A dog’s average lifespan is around 12 or 13 years, but again, this varies widely by breed. The larger your dog is, the less time it will live. Female dogs tend to live a little longer.

Dog emergency – Poison

4 Jan

Well, fun times for the holidays.  I went out to have lunch with a friend.  As the crazy times of the holidays were in full swing, I unfortunately had to cut my luncheon short due to an appointment that was rescheduled at the last-minute.  So as I returned home, and I walked in through the door I looked around and saw the family puttering along and the dogs lounging throughout the room.  I looked down on the floor so see a mutilated yellow box that I know contained mouse poison! 

Oh no!!!! I have a real challenge here.  No one saw which dog it was, no dog was confessing, the door bell was ringing, the kids were beginning to understand this situation, I got the vet office on the phone….chaos insued

The first thing I was told to do in induce vomiting in all dogs.  I had no idea which dog it was, so they all needed to be checked.  How do you accomplish that task?  Have them drink a tiny amount of hydrogen peroxide.  So as fast as we could, we all grabbed a dog (4 of them) and began to have them ingest the peroxide.  It was difficult to say the least.  I didn’t know a dog could spit…but they can.  We got the appropriate amount into each of them, and then put them in the back yard.  I spent the next 10 minutes following them around so when they did up chuck I could look at it to see if there was evidence of the poison.  3 of the 4 dogs got sick and all 3 were free of any poison.  The last one, the smallest, refused to throw up.  I call the vet back and they said to run him and gently shake him.  So we did.  We,  as gently as we could,  shook him like a soda bottle and ran him up and down the drive way.  He is only 10 pounds.  He would not vomit.  So, as a process of elimination I grabbed the empty box of poison and the dog and went to the emergency vet clinic. 

Within minutes they were able to induce vomiting with a single injection.  He was the guilty party, he ate the entire contents of the box.  Fortunately he only had it in him for about an hour, so there is no harm.  We were all Blessed for the timing of everything and that he didn’t hide the container.  The vet said that most dogs come to them when the symptoms begin to manifest, then it can be too late.  We were given medicine for the next few weeks and a bill of health. 

Wow, crazy stuff and I am glad it is over with a happy ending.  Now I know what to do if it ever happens again.  Also I have eliminated any other mouse poisons from my house!

Still in the po po

19 Oct

Well, I hope the jargon is taken with light humor and no offense.  It is a loving comment to my stubborn canine companion.

Yep… Banjo is still being trained.  The rascal is not wanting to listen.  What started out as a 3 week program is now pushing past the 6th week with a driven and determined trainer.

Paws and Heels are dug into the ground.  Both are determined to win.  The trainer has the upper hand.  Opposable thumbs, advanced cranial skills, and a loving heart wanting to help this dog ‘get it’.  The dog just wants to run free. 

If you recall he is a Rhodesian ridgeback.  A dog bred to hunt lions.  Logic would have it that- that dog cannot be too smart, otherwise it would refuse to do the job it was designed for.  I wonder, what do they do when they find a lion?  Huh…something to think about.

Any way, I miss him dearly and am not allowed to visit.  It disrupts his behavior and cooperation when I am there.  That cannot be a good sign.  He is still in the big house, the pokey, the clinker….and so on.  He cannot get out until he comes on command off leash.  The whole point is to train him for his own safety.  He likes to run into the street. 

What happens when an unstoppable force meets an immovable object?   We will find out.

Canine attitude

30 Sep

Continue reading

That darn dog – time to train

20 Sep

Well, I have to say my dog Banjo is something else.  He is a Rhodesian ridgeback mix.  He is about 2 1/2 years old.  Anyone with a larger breed dog will tell you that the puppy phase lasts a few years more that you would think – so far his is 2 1/2 years. 

Banjo has a heart of gold.  He also is very tall and long.  He can reach anything.  The other dogs actually use this to their advantage.  They run point for him, and make sure the coast is clear.  They also get him to reach things for them.  Yes, you betcha – I believe this conspiracy is real! 

Banjo doesn’t need opposable thumbs.  He has the nose that can open any door, drawer, or cabinet.  I have no idea how.  He doesn’t destroy things.  He doesn’t mess in the house, break things, damage items or anything bad in the house.  He has the sweetest face, and really wants to please his family.  God love him, he just doesn’t know how. 

He is always underfoot.  He loves to give everyone who comes near him 1 kiss.  Just one and then walks away.  That means he will jump and jump until he gets you, and then go lay down.  He doesn’t hurt anyone doing that ( on purpose), except and occasional bump.  Regardless, it is unacceptable.  I have tried many techniques to break him of this, nothing so far has helped. 

He also likes to see what is going on.  He will be in the middle of everything as a result.  Being a large dog he is, many times,  just out of eye sight – but a big enough object to always trip on.  So there are many folks who are constantly trying to catch themselves from falling – and most people do not respond happily to that.  He gets hooted at quite a bit for that.  I have worked with him on boundaries and sit/stay.  He doesn’t quite seem to grasp the actions, word associations, or commands I have worked with him on.  He just looks confused and sad when he gets into trouble. (getting into trouble usually means crated or put outside for a short time)

So with all the pressure and verbal tirades of the family to “do something” I have found him a trainer for a few weeks.  I have him one on one with someone who is on a mission to help him.  I have brought trainers in home, taken him to classes with a group, privately and despite the different types of help – he couldn’t grasp it.  I have to give him the benefit of this type of training in hopes that it is me that cannot properly train him – and for him there is  hope.  He is not bad, or mean, or an angry dog.  He is sweet, and tail wagging.  He only barks if he needs to go out, or if he sees a squirrel.  Other than that he is quiet.  When he does bark it is very loud – the rafters shake.

Well with him gone I am the only one who seems to miss him.  Not a good sign for Banjo.  I hope this will be a good outcome for him.  Or at least for my family.  I have invested enough time and money into this guy for training and so forth that – well lets be honest – I need to think a bit more carefully of who is a keeper in the house.  (joking)

I think if he is better behaved, and understands his surroundings better he will me a much happier dog.  I think it will help him to ‘be in the know’   as well as understand the word no! 

God’s speed Banjo – I love you.

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