Tag Archives: Animal

What would happen to your pets if you died?

31 Jul

Have you wondered what would happen to your pet if you passed away?  A tragedy on your part, I understand, but what of them?  Presuming you have taken care of your children if you have them and they are under age (through a will and discussions with peoples involved)…what about the dogs?

I laugh when super wealthy folks will their pets 10 million dollars, but I can sort of see their point.  I don’t know anyone that would really want my dogs (or be able to handle them) other than a short visit.  They would probably not be able to stay together (which they are used to)  Unless financially tended to and some provision made for them, they would go to the pound.  Their world would change forever. their content life of eating a certain food at a specific time, sleeping on the same spot, playing the same games and the loving pettings in each one’s specific favorite way would end.  You know they would mourn the changes and life they had.  They wouldn’t understand or know why it changes, just that is has. 

All the scent’s they are used to, the routines they count on, the pack they lovingly share  – perhaps that is a gap in the marketplace someone can open a business for.  BillyBob’s afterlife canine care…. Will us XXX.00 dollars and instructions…we will see that your dog’s care will continue as you wish – and they stay together (if more than one).  Loving environment guaranteed.  Billy Bob can hire loving retired people, kind-hearted teenager’s, and generally great pet loving people to help fill the gap in the pets lives.  Medical care for special needs dogs, exercise, play, and clean living space.  There can be attorney inspectors for  a person’s will wishes.  Maybe not 10 million dollars, but perhaps 20,000 dollars would allow a successful business and a great option for pets. Far fetched I know, but I just love my pups and I would be happy if they are provided for.  I wouldn’t burden anyone else, and someone could make a living.

I don’t know, clearly I am being a bit silly.  I just wonder from their perspective how hard it would be.  Yes they would adjust, I know.  We work hard at taking care of them in our own way, and we believe it is the best for our pets.  I guess it finds a way to work out most of the time.  I think I will look into being sure mine will be ok if an unforseen tragedy occurs.  Who knows maybe I will find a Billy Bob’s out there.

Advertisements

Dog emergency – Poison

4 Jan

Well, fun times for the holidays.  I went out to have lunch with a friend.  As the crazy times of the holidays were in full swing, I unfortunately had to cut my luncheon short due to an appointment that was rescheduled at the last-minute.  So as I returned home, and I walked in through the door I looked around and saw the family puttering along and the dogs lounging throughout the room.  I looked down on the floor so see a mutilated yellow box that I know contained mouse poison! 

Oh no!!!! I have a real challenge here.  No one saw which dog it was, no dog was confessing, the door bell was ringing, the kids were beginning to understand this situation, I got the vet office on the phone….chaos insued

The first thing I was told to do in induce vomiting in all dogs.  I had no idea which dog it was, so they all needed to be checked.  How do you accomplish that task?  Have them drink a tiny amount of hydrogen peroxide.  So as fast as we could, we all grabbed a dog (4 of them) and began to have them ingest the peroxide.  It was difficult to say the least.  I didn’t know a dog could spit…but they can.  We got the appropriate amount into each of them, and then put them in the back yard.  I spent the next 10 minutes following them around so when they did up chuck I could look at it to see if there was evidence of the poison.  3 of the 4 dogs got sick and all 3 were free of any poison.  The last one, the smallest, refused to throw up.  I call the vet back and they said to run him and gently shake him.  So we did.  We,  as gently as we could,  shook him like a soda bottle and ran him up and down the drive way.  He is only 10 pounds.  He would not vomit.  So, as a process of elimination I grabbed the empty box of poison and the dog and went to the emergency vet clinic. 

Within minutes they were able to induce vomiting with a single injection.  He was the guilty party, he ate the entire contents of the box.  Fortunately he only had it in him for about an hour, so there is no harm.  We were all Blessed for the timing of everything and that he didn’t hide the container.  The vet said that most dogs come to them when the symptoms begin to manifest, then it can be too late.  We were given medicine for the next few weeks and a bill of health. 

Wow, crazy stuff and I am glad it is over with a happy ending.  Now I know what to do if it ever happens again.  Also I have eliminated any other mouse poisons from my house!

Tornado’s, natural disasters, and our Dogs, Cats and other Pets

24 May

So, how is all this tragedy working for you?  It has been incredible.  For many unbearable.  The toll on the people is sad, tragic, and everyone needs our prayers – and honestly help.  Money, time, effort, assistance, clothes, food, anything.  The need is great.

Don’t forget the animal shelters that are taking in the lost and injured animals.  The influx of animals and the increased costs are a strain.  To help keep the quality of care as good as possible these shelters need to close the gap on what monies they have and what they now need.  Donations of toys, crates, food, food, food, liter, blankets, and of course money really will  help. 

It will take time to reunite owners, if they can be found.  It will take time for the owners to be able to be in a position to take the pets back in some cases.  These animals need help, medical attention, and affection.  They also provide affection, but also a good stability for their families that have lost homes and communities.  The comfort and companionship they give provides normalcy and familiarity.  When someone is looking at a destroyed home, losses of everything they have – but their family and pets are by their side – there is a different perspective.  The ‘bright side’ is able to be found.  “At least we are all together and safe” is heard a lot.  You can rebuild a structure – but family…all members…. are irreplaceable. 

They are so necessary to people who have them.  They fill voids, close gaps, elevate moods, comfort a heart, and calm spirits.

In some cases these storms take the animals.  They get lost, injured, and sometimes the horrible loss.  If you are a pet owner, and you prepare for unexpected events, don’t forget the animals too.  Go to the red cross for advise on how to prepare for your pets during a natural disaster – or other big unexpected event.  A little preparation can go a long way.

God Bless the people going through these hard times.  God Bless our country.  God Bless everyone who is stepping up and helping in what every capacity they are able.  God Bless our dogs, cats, and other pets.

Crazy things a dog will do

31 Jan
Rhodesian Ridgeback during dogs show in Katowi...

Image via Wikipedia

Ok,  I have three dogs.  You never know what will happen.  I have to say, this experience that i am about to describe has been the most unbelievable thing yet.  One of my three seems to be the most mischievous.

I have a Rhodesian ridgeback.  He is 2 years old, likes to hunt, run, and jump.  He is funny and sweet.  There is also a disgusting streak that runs deep in him.  We jus had a 9 in snow drop.  He was out romping and having a fun time.  I was keeping an eye on him, and he wears a remote leash.  When he gets too far or I want him inside, I call him and press the button (on the lowest setting possible).

Well, I noticed him in the front yard under a cedar tree, close to the street.  I wanted him to come towards the back where it is safer.  I called him, and pressed the button.  He completely ignored me and was laser focused on something he had.  I couldn’t tell what it was, but I knew it was going to be gross. 

Since it was freezing cold, I went upstairs to bundle up and put on some boots.  As I came down the stairs I could see him up closer to the house, so I could go out the front door to grab him.  I walked out onto the porch and looked at the snow-covered ground (my front yard is a 1 acre sloping hill).  What ever he had in his mouth (still) was bleeding all over the yard.  It looked like a massacre had occurred.  I could not believe the amount of blood spilled everywhere.  This is where my panic driven heart attack began.  I looked at my dog and he was holding in his mouth, in a protective manner, some type of animal head.  Yep, I said head.  AHHHHH was my first response.  I then had to get him to DROP IT!  I needed to put it in a bag and try to identify it, incase it was another dog.  It looked like a dog or canine type animal.  I rolled it over and could not tell what it was.  With a stick I was able to get it into a large bag.  I called animal control, they came out and identified it as a deer head.  OMG!  I was so disgusted.

It was traumatic and finally over.  Or so I thought.  One week later, the dog came running back to the house to come inside to enjoy his new find.  It was a leg of the deer that still had ‘material’ on it.  Again…AHHHHH.  So with much yanking and demanding he finally relinquished the ‘bone’.  Bagged it and threw it away.

So now I need to go into the woods and find this animal before anymore of it ends up on or near my porch.  Not to mention any illness my dogs may get by eating this thing.  Well for now that is the end of this experience.  With any luck there will be no more shocking scenes.  UGH!